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Storage Decisions Session Downloads: Executive/Management Track (New York 2008)

Sometimes technology alone won't solve storage-related issues. You also need to be adept about the business of acquiring storage systems. As a storage manager, you will be called on to develop storage solutions to satisfy evolving business needs -- always with an eye on the key financial acid tests for any storage purchase: ROI and TCO.

This track addresses the essential parts of the storage system procurement process, including how to craft an RFP, negotiating from a position of strength, evaluating systems and getting the support of your company's management.

TRACK: MANAGEMENT/EXECUTIVE
Sometimes technology alone won't solve storage-related issues. You also need to be adept about the business of acquiring storage systems. As a storage manager, you will be called on to develop storage solutions to satisfy evolving business needs -- always with an eye on the key financial acid tests for any storage purchase: ROI and TCO. This track addresses the essential parts of the storage system procurement process, including how to craft an RFP, negotiating from a position of strength, evaluating systems and getting the support of your company's management.

Downloads included in this track: (click title to download slides)

Business Buy-In: The Art of Project Justification
Speaker: Scott Matey, Managing Director, GlassHouse Technologies
Description: Whether you're developing storage vendor selection criteria, arguing for DR dollars or trying to slash costs in your data center, you need to know how to talk to the C-level suits so they get it. Getting buy-in from business units and company executives isn't about touting speeds and feeds. You'll need to justify your projects and planned purchases in business terms that often go beyond simple TCO or ROI formulas.

Purchasing Storage: What the Vendors Don't Want You to Know
Speaker: Bill Peldzus, VP Data Center Services, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery, GlassHouse Technologies
Description: In this session, you learn the questions you should be asking of ALL of your storage vendors, and other important tips and techniques for writing an air-tight RFI or RFP (they are different!). Bill Peldzus uses real case studies and actual customer purchasing engagements as examples.

What Storage Manager's Are Buying
Speaker: Rich Castagna, Editorial Director, Storage Media Group
Description: Storage managers have many challenges to deal with—not the least of which is the unrelenting need to add more disk capacity. As installed capacity continues to spiral upward, beleaguered storage pros are looking for new ways to manage and administer high-capacity storage environments. In this session, we analyze and present the results of Storage magazine's twice-yearly Purchasing Intentions survey. The results of this exclusive show key trends and the types of solutions storage managers are seeking, while revealing some of the strategic and tactical decisions they'll be making this year.

Managing the Four C's: Cost Containment, Compliance, Continuity and Carbon Footprint
Speaker: Jon Toigo, CEO, Toigo Partners International
Description: Nearly every company today has a set of front burner issues that come down to 4 "C's": Cost Containment, Compliance, Continuity and Carbon Reduction. At root, every one of these issues requires a strategy for improved data management. In this presentation, Toigo will address the following topics based on his new book, Making IT Matter (currently being developed as a BLOOK by Toigo, and co-author Randy Chalfant, at MakingITMatter.com).

Green and Environmental Friendly Storage: Practical Ways to Achieve Energy
Speaker: Greg Schulz, Founder and Senior Analyst, StorageIO
Description: Green is in—and every storage vendor out there has a green story to tell. The need to reduce power consumption in the data center is compelling and storage—accounting for an estimated 40% of data center electrical consumption—is a major target for energy conservation. Despite the vendor hyperbole about the environmental benefits of their products, there are still no standard metrics by which to measure and compare power consumption claims. This session will provide a general overview of green storage and explore practical approaches for power reduction.

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Other tracks
Backup Technologies Track
Disaster Recovery Track
Storage & Capacity Management Track
Systems & Networking Track

Dig Deeper on Data storage strategy

Storage Decisions Session Downloads: Managing Storage Networks Track (Chicago 2009)

The core of any networked storage infrastructure is the basic hardware components: storage arrays and the fabric that links them to client servers and other services. Over the past few years, the trend has been to networks built around director-class switches -- but how those directors are used is the key to whether they're just consolidation points to replace core-edge architectures or if they actually put more intelligence into the network.

Storage systems, too, have undergone considerable change. iSCSI storage arrays have steady increased their presence in data centers and remote locations, and as iSCSI technology and implementations mature, their impact is certain to become more profound. And on the leading edge of storage are systems that eschew or greatly reduce the role of spinning disks, replacing them with solid state devices that run cool, use far less power and take up less space. In this track, we'll look at the implications of these recent developments.

Storage Decisions Session Downloads: Data Retention & Retrieval Track (Chicago 2009) Call it regulatory compliance, legal vigilance, good disk management or just plain common sense -- regardless of your company's motivation, a sound system for retaining and disposing of data is one of the modern requirements of storage management. Developing a consistent, repeatable and practical set of data retention policies is the first step in the process. Tools such as data classification applications can help automate the process of sorting through the reams of structured and unstructured data to determine its appropriate disposition. While storage managers may consider this a business unit function, as keepers of company's data they are very much in the mix. And, as such, they need to know about the legal implications, the types of systems best suited for retained data and how encryption can help ensure that data is kept intact in its original form.
Storage Decisions Session Downloads: Storage Systems & Storage Management Track (Chicago 2009) With spiraling capacities the norm, managing storage systems has become a challenging task. Traditional SRM tools are often adept on keeping tabs on the state of your storage infrastructure, but more focused applications are becoming increasingly available. Storage virtualization also promises to ease storage management and improve disk usage, but there are inherent issues that need to be fully understood before embarking on a virtualization project. Traditional methods of operational data protection such as RAID tend to be complex and difficult to configure and manage, but some storage vendors are offering compelling alternatives. In this track, we'll also examine power conservation for storage systems, a new requisite for most storage shops struggling to balance increased capacity and soaring energy costs.
Storage Decisions Session Downloads: Data Retention & Retrieval Track (San Francisco 2008) Call it regulatory compliance, legal vigilance, good disk management or just plain common sense -- regardless of your company's motivation, a sound system for retaining and disposing of data is one of the modern requirements of storage management. Developing a consistent, repeatable and practical set of data retention policies is the first step in the process. Tools such as data classification applications can help automate the process of sorting through the reams of structured and unstructured data to determine its appropriate disposition. While storage managers may consider this a business unit function, as keepers of company's data they are very much in the mix. And, as such, they need to know about the legal implications, the types of systems best suited for retained data and how encryption can help ensure that data is kept intact in its original form.

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