Storage management and analytics Definitions

Search Definitions
  • A

    access time

    Access time is the time from the start of one storage device access to the time when the next access can be started.

  • active archive

    An active archive is a collection of data that is too valuable for a company to discard, but only needs to be accessed occasionally.

  • ADSTAR Distributed Storage Management (ADSM)

    ADSTAR Distributed Storage Management (ADSM) is a collective term for IBM's family of high-end software that helps a customer manage the storage devices (such as mainframe storage, PC disk drives, and Zip drives) that are scattered around the company.

  • Andrew file system (AFS)

    An Andrew file system (AFS) is a location-independent file system that uses a local cache to reduce the workload and increase the performance of a distributed computing environment.

  • archive

    In enterprise data storage, an archive is a collection of infrequently accessed data that needs to be stored for long periods of time to meet backup and compliance requirements.

  • atomic storage (atomic memory)

    Atomic storage (sometimes called atomic memory) is a nanotechnology approach to computer data storage that works with bits and atoms on the individual level.

  • auxiliary storage

    Auxiliary storage is all addressable data storage that is not currently in a computer's main storage or memory.

  • B

    bad block

    A bad block is an area of storage media that is no longer reliable for storing and retrieving data because it has been physically damaged or corrupted.

  • big data storage

    Big data storage is a compute-and-storage architecture that collects and manages large data sets and enables real-time data analytics.

  • bit padding

    Bit padding is the addition of one or more extra bits to a transmission or storage unit to make it conform to a standard size.

  • bit rot

    Bit rot is the slow deterioration in the performance and integrity of data stored on storage media. It is also known by the names bit decay, data rot, data decay and silent corruption.

  • business impact analysis (BIA)

    Business impact analysis (BIA) is a systematic process to determine and evaluate the potential effects of an interruption to critical business operations as a result of a disaster, accident or emergency.

  • byte

    In most computer systems, a byte is a unit of data that is eight binary digits long. Bytes are often used to represent a character such as a letter, number or typographic symbol.

  • C

    cache (computing)

    A cache -- pronounced CASH -- is hardware or software that is used to store something, usually data, temporarily in a computing environment.

  • cache algorithm

    A cache algorithm is a detailed list of instructions that decides which items should be discarded in a computer's cache of information.

  • capacity management

    Capacity management is the broad term describing a variety of IT monitoring, administration and planning actions that are taken to ensure that a computing infrastructure has adequate resources to handle current data processing requirements as well as the capacity to accommodate future loads.

  • Ceph

    Ceph is open source software providing scalable object-, block- and file-based storage under a unified system. Red Hat and SUSE sell commercially supported versions of Ceph.

  • cloud computing maturity model (CCMM)

    A Cloud Computing Maturity Model (CCMM) is a model that defines and analyzes the progress of an organization’s ability to deliver cloud services in key areas such as capabilities, domains, maturity and adoption.

  • Cloud Data Management Interface

    Cloud Data Management Interface (CDMI) is a Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) industry standard that defines the interface that applications will use to create, retrieve, update and delete data elements from the cloud.

  • cold storage

    Cold storage is a computer system designed for retaining inactive data, such as information required for regulatory compliance, at low cost and high efficiency.

  • computational storage

    Computational storage is an information technology (IT) architecture in which data is processed at the storage device level to reduce the amount of data that has to move between the storage plane and the compute plane.

  • continuous data protection (storage convergence)

    Continuous data protection (CDP), also called continuous backup, is a storage system in which all the data in an enterprise is backed up whenever any change is made.

  • D

    data availability

    Data availability is a term used by some computer storage manufacturers and storage service providers (SSPs) to describe products and services that ensure that data continues to be available at a required level of performance in situations ranging from normal through "disastrous.

  • data center migration plan

    A data center migration plan is a strategy created by an organization to migrate a data center with minimal downtime.

  • data deduplication

    Data deduplication -- often called intelligent compression or single-instance storage -- is a process that eliminates redundant copies of data and reduces storage overhead.

  • data destruction

    Data destruction is the process of destroying data stored on tapes, hard disks and other forms of electronic media so that it is completely unreadable and cannot be accessed or used for unauthorized purposes.

  • data life cycle management (DLM)

    Data life cycle management (DLM) is a policy-based approach to managing the flow of an information system's data throughout its life cycle: from creation and initial storage to the time when it becomes obsolete and is deleted.

  • data management platform (DMP)

    A data management platform (DMP), also referred to as a unified data management platform (UDMP), is a centralized system for collecting and analyzing large sets of data originating from disparate sources.

  • data storage

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical or silicon-based storage media.

  • DDR SDRAM (double data rate SDRAM)

    DDR SDRAM (double data rate SDRAM) is synchronous dynamic RAM (SDRAM) that can theoretically improve memory clock speed to at least 200 MHz*. It activates output on both the rising and falling edge of the system clock rather than on just the rising edge, potentially doubling output.

  • deep archive

    A deep archive is a type of data archiving that refers to a storage location for data that will likely never be accessed again, but can't be deleted.

  • direct-attached storage (DAS)

    Direct-attached storage (DAS) is computer storage that is connected to one computer and not accessible to other computers.

  • disk mirroring (RAID 1)

    RAID 1 is one of the most common RAID levels and the most reliable. Data is written to two places simultaneously, so if one disk fails, the other can be used to retrieve data.

  • DRAM (dynamic random access memory)

    Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) is a type of semiconductor memory that is typically used for the data or program code needed by a computer processor to function.

  • DRDRAM (Rambus Dynamic Random Access Memory)

    RDRAM (Rambus Dynamic Random Access Memory) is a memory subsystem that promises to transfer up to 1.6 billion bytes per second.

  • driver

    A driver is a program that interacts with a particular device or special (frequently optional) kind of software.

  • dual-layer magnetic tape (dual-side magnetic tape)

    Dual-layer magnetic tape, also known as dual-side magnetic tape, is a high-density storage medium capable of holding far more data than conventional tape backup... (Continued)

  • DVD (digital video disk)

    DVD is an optical disc technology with a 4.7 gigabyte storage capacity on a single-sided, one-layered disk, which is enough for a 133-minute movie.

  • DVD Forum

    The DVD Forum is an international organization made up of companies using or manufacturing digital versatile disc (DVD)-related products.

  • DVD-Audio (DVD-A)

    DVD-Audio (DVD-A) is a Digital Versatile Disc (DVD) format, developed by Panasonic, that is specifically designed to hold audio data, and particularly, high-quality music.

  • DVD-RAM

    DVD-RAM is a DVD(optical disc) technology for high-capacity data storage for computers.

  • E

    EDO RAM (extended data output RAM)

    EDO (extended data output) RAM is a type of random access memory (RAM) chip that improves the time to read from memory on faster microprocessors such as the Intel Pentium.

  • email archiving

    Email archiving (also spelled e-mail archiving) is a systematic approach to saving and protecting the data contained in email messages to enable fast retrieval.

  • enterprise storage

    Enterprise storage is a centralized repository for business information that provides common data management, protection and data sharing functions through connections to computer systems.

  • exabyte (EB)

    An exabyte (EB) is a large unit of computer data storage, two to the sixtieth power bytes.

  • exbibyte (EiB)

    An exbibyte (EiB) is a unit used to measure data capacity.

  • Express Bay

    Express Bay is an externally accessible storage slot that is designed to accept a high-performance PCI Express (PCIe) solid-state drive (SSD),

  • external storage device

    An external storage device, also referred to as auxiliary storage and secondary storage, is a device that contains all the addressable data storage that is not inside a computer's main storage or memory.

  • F

    failover

    Failover is a backup operational mode in which the functions of a system component (such as a processor, server, network, or database, for example) are assumed by secondary system components when the primary component becomes unavailable through either failure or scheduled down time.

  • file storage

    File storage stores data in a hierarchical structure, usually in a NAS system. The system storing data and the client retrieving data see files and folders in the same format.

  • file-area network (FAN)

    A file-area network (FAN) is a set of technologies that facilitate file sharing and data management over a network.

  • FPM DRAM (Fast Page Mode DRAM)

    Prior to newer forms of dynamic random access memory (DRAM), FPM DRAM (Fast Page Mode DRAM) was the most common kind of DRAM in personal computers.

  • FRAM (ferroelectric RAM)

    FRAM (ferroelectric RAM) is random access memory that combines the fast read and write access of dynamic RAM (DRAM) - the most common kind of personal computer memory - with the ability to retain data when power is turned off (as do other non-volatile memory devices such as ROM and flash memory).

  • G

    geek speak

    Geek speak is how the uninitiated refer to the jargon and special vocabulary used by those immersed in computers and other fields of information technology.

  • gibibyte (GiB)

    A gibibyte (GiB) is a unit of measure of capacity used in computing.

  • global namespace

    Global namespace is a feature that provides a consolidated view into multiple Network File Systems (NFS), Common Internet File Systems (CIFS), network-attached storage (NAS) systems or file servers that are in different physical locations.

  • green storage

    Green storage is the practice of using a variety of "clean energy" storage methods and products to cut down on a data center's carbon footprint, as well as cost.

  • grid storage

    Grid storage is a general term for any approach to storing data that employs multiple self-contained storage nodes interconnected so that any node can communicate with any other node without the data having to pass through a centralized switch. (Continued...)

  • H

    HA storage (high-availability storage)

    High-availability storage (HA storage) is a storage system that is continuously operational or provides at least 99% uptime.

  • Hadoop as a service (HaaS)

    Hadoop as a service (HaaS), also known as Hadoop in the cloud, is a big data analytics framework that stores and analyzes data in the cloud using Hadoop.

  • hard zoning

    Hard zoning is used to allocate resources and control access in a storage-area network (SAN).

  • HD-DVD (high-density DVD)

    HD-DVD (high-density DVD) is an optical digital storage medium with a capacity that far exceeds that of standard DVD media... (Continued)

  • HD-ROM (High-Density - Read Only Memory)

    HD-ROM (High-Density - Read Only Memory) is a high-capacity storage technology developed at Norsam Technologies in conjunction with an IBM research group that enables a disk to store hundreds of times as much information as a CD-ROM. HD-ROM uses a very narrow, finely-focused particle beam (charged gallium ions) to write data.

  • holographic storage (holostorage)

    Holographic storage is computer storage that uses laser beams to store computer-generated data in three dimensions.

  • hot data

    Hot data is a reference to data that is accessed the most by an organization.

  • How many bytes for...

    This page provides tables and other information about how many bytes are required (how much computer storage) for various information objects or purposes; it also summarizes some facts that have been gathered about how much information exists in the world and, where appropriate, how much computer storage this requires.

  • I

    I/O contention (input/output contention)

    I/O contention (input/output contention), occurs when virtual machines compete for I/O resources because there is a limited storage bandwidth.

  • information architecture

    In technical writing, information architecture is the set of ideas about how all information in a given context should be treated philosophically and, in a general way, how it should be organized.

  • International Standard Recording Code (ISRC)

    The International Standard Recording Code (ISRC) is an international code used to identify sound and audio-visual recordings on compact discs (CDs), music videos, and other media, primarily to ensure royalty payments.

  • K

    Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi, and all that

    Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi, and exbi are binary prefix multipliers that, in 1998, were approved as a standard by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in an effort to eliminate the confusion that sometimes occurs between decimal (power-of-10) and binary (power-of-2) numeration terms.

  • kilobyte (KB or Kbyte)

    A kilobyte (KB or Kbyte) is a unit of measurement for computer memory or data storage used by mathematics and computer science professionals, along with the general public, when referring to amounts of computer data using the metric system.

  • Kryder's Law

    Kryder's Law describes the rate at which former Seagate CTO Mark Kryder predicted disk drive density would grow.

  • L

    legacy storage

    Legacy storage is traditional storage hardware that is older and sometimes no longer sold by its vendor.

  • litigation hold (preservation orders or hold orders)

    Litigation hold is a stipulation requiring a company to preserve all data that may relate to a legal action involving the company... (Continued)

  • M

    mebibyte (MiB)

    A mebibyte (MiB) is a unit of measurement used in computer data storage.

  • megabyte (MB)

    As a measure of computer processor storage and real and virtual memory, a megabyte (abbreviated MB) is 2 to the 20th power bytes, or 1,048,576 bytes in decimal notation.

  • megabytes per second (MBps)

    Megabytes per second (MBps) is a unit of measurement for data transfer speed to and from a computer storage device.

  • Millipede

    Millipede is a nano-storage prototype developed by IBM that can store data at a density of a trillion bits per square inch: 20 times more than any currently available magnetic storage medium.

  • mirror site

    A mirrored site is a website or set of files on a server that has been copied to another server so that the site or files are available from more than one place.

  • MTTR (mean time to repair)

    MTTR (mean time to repair) is the average time required to fix a failed component or device and return it to production status.

  • N

    nearline storage

    Nearline storage is the on-site storage of data on removable media.

  • NetApp Data Fabric

    The products and services that compose NetApp’s Data Fabric are designed to provide customers with the agility they need to quickly and efficiently move data to and from the cloud.

  • non-disruptive data migration

    Non-disruptive data migration is a feature that allows data movement from one storage device to another without causing downtime in the environment.

  • non-disruptive upgrade (NDU)

    A non-disruptive upgrade (NDU) is an update to software or hardware done without interruption to system service or data access.

  • non-volatile memory (NVM)

    Non-volatile memory (NVMe) is a semiconductor technology that does not require a continuous power supply to retain the data or program code stored in a computing device.

  • O

    ODCA (Open Data Center Alliance)

    The Open Data Center Alliance (ODCA) is an independent information technology (IT) consortium whose goal is to develop a unified vision of cloud requirements.

  • open source cloud storage

    Open source cloud storage is a cloud storage architecture that uses freely available source code to build and manage a private cloud storage platform.

  • open source storage

    Open source storage is data storage software developed in a public, collaborative manner that permits the free use, distribution and modification of the source code.

  • orthogonal

    Orthogonal concepts have their roots in advanced mathematics. They are also associated with software development, storage and networking.

  • P

    pebibyte (PiB)

    A pebibyte (PiB) is a unit of measure used to describe data capacity.

  • persistent storage

    Persistent storage is any data storage device that retains data after power to that device is shut off. It is also sometimes referred to as non-volatile storage.

  • petabyte

    A petabyte is a measure of memory or data storage capacity that is equal to 2 to the 50th power of bytes.

  • pipeline burst cache

    A pipeline burst cache is a cache or storage area for a computer processor that is designed to be read from or written to in a pipelining succession of four data transfers (or bursts) in which later bursts can start to flow or transfer before the first burst has arrived at the processor.

  • portability

    Portability is a characteristic attributed to a computer program if it can be used in an operating systems other than the one in which it was created without requiring major rework.

  • production data

    Production data is data that is persistently stored and essential to completing day-to-day business tasks and processes.

  • protected mode

    Protected mode is a mode of program operation in a computer with an Intel-based microprocessor in which the program is restricted to addressing a specific contiguous area of 640 kilobytes.

  • Q

    Quiz: Data Storage

    Computer storage is the holding of data in an electromagnetic form for access by a computer processor.

  • R

    RADOS (Reliable Autonomic Distributed Object Store)

    Reliable Autonomic Distributed Object Store (RADOS) is an object storage service with the ability to scale to thousands of hardware devices by making use of management software that runs on each of the individual nodes. RADOS is an integral part of the Ceph distributed storage system.

  • RADOS Block Device (RBD)

    A RADOS Block Device (RBD) is software that facilitates the storage of block-based data in the open source Ceph distributed storage system.

  • RAID 10 (RAID 1+0)

    RAID 10, also known as RAID 1+0, is a RAID configuration that combines disk mirroring and disk striping to protect data.

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