Data storage management Definitions

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  • A

    access method

    In computing, an access method is a program or a hardware mechanism that moves data between the computer and an outlying device such as a hard disk (or other form of storage) or a display terminal.

  • active archive

    An active archive is a collection of data that is too valuable for a company to discard, but only needs to be accessed occasionally.

  • address space

    Address space is the amount of memory allocated for all possible addresses for a computational entity, such as a device, a file, a server, or a networked computer.

  • ADSTAR Distributed Storage Management (ADSM)

    ADSTAR Distributed Storage Management (ADSM) is a collective term for IBM's family of high-end software that helps a customer manage the storage devices (such as mainframe storage, PC disk drives, and Zip drives) that are scattered around the company.

  • AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface)

    Advanced Host Controller Interface, or AHCI, is a technical standard for an interface that enables software to communicate with Serial ATA (SATA) devices.

  • Andrew file system (AFS)

    An Andrew file system (AFS) is a location-independent file system that uses a local cache to reduce the workload and increase the performance of a distributed computing environment.

  • archive

    In enterprise data storage, an archive is a collection of infrequently accessed data that needs to be stored for long periods of time to meet backup and compliance requirements.

  • atomic storage (atomic memory)

    Atomic storage (sometimes called atomic memory) is a nanotechnology approach to computer data storage that works with bits and atoms on the individual level.

  • B

    bad block

    A bad block is an area of storage media that is no longer reliable for storing and retrieving data because it has been physically damaged or corrupted.

  • BEDO DRAM (Burst Extended Data Output DRAM)

    BEDO DRAM (Burst Extended Data Output DRAM) is a type of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) that can send data back to the computer from one read operation at the same time it is reading in the address of the next data to be sent.

  • bit padding

    Bit padding is the addition of one or more extra bits to a transmission or storage unit to make it conform to a standard size.

  • bit rot

    Bit rot is the slow deterioration in the performance and integrity of data stored on storage media. It is also known by the names bit decay, data rot, data decay and silent corruption.

  • block storage

    Block storage is an approach to data storage in which each storage volume acts as an individual hard drive that is configured by the storage administrator. In the block storage model, data is saved to the storage media in fixed-sized chunks called blocks.

  • brontobyte

    A brontobyte is a measure of memory or data storage that is equal to 10 to the 27th power of bytes.

  • buffer credits or buffer-to-buffer credits (BBCs)

    Buffer credits, also called buffer-to-buffer credits (BBCs), allow data communication in a Fibre Channelstorage area network (SAN) where there are long spans of fiber opticcable.

  • buffer flush

    A buffer flush is the transfer of computer data from a temporary storage area to the computer's permanent memory.

  • bus

    In a computer or on a network, a bus is a transmission path on which signals are dropped off or picked up at every device attached to the line.

  • byte

    In most computer systems, a byte is a unit of data that is eight binary digits long. Bytes are often used to represent a character such as a letter, number or typographic symbol.

  • C

    cache algorithm

    A cache algorithm is a detailed list of instructions that decides which items should be discarded in a computer's cache of information.

  • cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access more quickly than it can access regular random access memory (RAM).

  • carrier hotel (colocation center)

    A carrier hotel, also called a colocation center, is a secure physical site or building where data communications media converge and are interconnected... (Continued)

  • charge-coupled device (CCD)

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) is a light-sensitive integrated circuit that stores and displays the data for an image in such a way that each pixel (picture element) in the image is converted into an electical charge the intensity of which is related to a color in the color spectrum.

  • CIFS (Common Internet File System)

    CIFS (Common Internet File System) is a protocol that gained popularity around the year 2000, as vendors worked to establish an Internet Protocol-based file-sharing protocol.

  • Common Information Model (CIM)

    The Common Information Model (CIM) is a computer industry standard for defining device and application characteristics so that system administrators and management programs will be able to control devices and applications from different manufacturers or sources in the same way.

  • compression artifact

    A compression artifact is the fuzz or distortion in a compressed image or sequence of video images.

  • Content Protection for Removable Media (CPRM)

    Content Protection for Removable Media (CPRM) is a hardware-based technology designed to enforce copy protection restrictions through built-in mechanisms in storage media that would prevent unauthorized file copying.

  • copy data

    Copy data is the electronic data that is created as a result of data protection functions like backups, snapshots and disaster recovery.

  • copy data management (CDM)

    Copy data management (CDM) is an approach to reducing storage consumption that involves eliminating the unnecessary duplication of production data.

  • D

    DASD (direct access storage device)

    Direct access storage device (DASD, pronounced DAZ-dee), is a general term for magnetic disk storage devices. The term has historically been used in the mainframe and minicomputer (mid-range computer) environments.

  • data compression

    Data compression is a reduction in the number of bits needed to represent data.

  • data deduplication

    Data deduplication -- often called intelligent compression or single-instance storage -- is a process that eliminates redundant copies of data and reduces storage overhead.

  • data destruction

    Data destruction is the process of destroying data stored on tapes, hard disks and other forms of electronic media so that it is completely unreadable and cannot be accessed or used for unauthorized purposes.

  • data life cycle management (DLM)

    Data life cycle management (DLM) is a policy-based approach to managing the flow of an information system's data throughout its life cycle: from creation and initial storage to the time when it becomes obsolete and is deleted.

  • data retention

    Data retention, also called records retention, is the continued storage of an organization's data for compliance or business reasons. 

  • DDR SDRAM (double data rate SDRAM)

    DDR SDRAM (double data rate SDRAM) is synchronous dynamic RAM (SDRAM) that can theoretically improve memory clock speed to at least 200 MHz*. It activates output on both the rising and falling edge of the system clock rather than on just the rising edge, potentially doubling output.

  • delta differencing

    Delta differencing is an incremental approach to backup that only backs up blocks that have changed after the first full backup. The differences are recorded in files called deltas.

  • depository

    A depository is a file or set of files in which data is stored for the purpose of safekeeping or identity authentication.

  • digital film

    Digital film is any storage medium (such as a memory card, diskette, or recordable CD) used in a digital camera to capture and store images.

  • DIMM (dual in-line memory module)

    DIMM (dual in-line memory module) is a type of computer memory that is natively 64 bits, enabling fast data transfer.

  • direct access

    In computer storage, direct access is the ability to obtain data from a storage device by going directly to where it is physically located on the device rather than by having to sequentially look for the data at one physical location after another.

  • DRAM (dynamic random access memory)

    Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) is a type of semiconductor memory that is typically used for the data or program code needed by a computer processor to function.

  • DRDRAM (Rambus Dynamic Random Access Memory)

    RDRAM (Rambus Dynamic Random Access Memory) is a memory subsystem that promises to transfer up to 1.6 billion bytes per second.

  • driver

    A driver is a program that interacts with a particular device or special (frequently optional) kind of software.

  • dropout

    A dropout is a small loss of data in an audio or video file on tape or disk.

  • E

    EDO RAM (extended data output RAM)

    EDO (extended data output) RAM is a type of random access memory (RAM) chip that improves the time to read from memory on faster microprocessors such as the Intel Pentium.

  • email archiving

    Email archiving (also spelled e-mail archiving) is a systematic approach to saving and protecting the data contained in email messages to enable fast retrieval.

  • exabyte (EB)

    An exabyte (EB) is a large unit of computer data storage, two to the sixtieth power bytes.

  • external storage device

    An external storage device, also referred to as auxiliary storage and secondary storage, is a device that contains all the addressable data storage that is not inside a computer's main storage or memory.

  • F

    file storage

    File storage stores data in a hierarchical structure, usually in a NAS system. The system storing data and the client retrieving data see files and folders in the same format.

  • file-area network (FAN)

    A file-area network (FAN) is a set of technologies that facilitate file sharing and data management over a network.

  • FPM DRAM (Fast Page Mode DRAM)

    Prior to newer forms of dynamic random access memory (DRAM), FPM DRAM (Fast Page Mode DRAM) was the most common kind of DRAM in personal computers.

  • FRAM (ferroelectric RAM)

    FRAM (ferroelectric RAM) is random access memory that combines the fast read and write access of dynamic RAM (DRAM) - the most common kind of personal computer memory - with the ability to retain data when power is turned off (as do other non-volatile memory devices such as ROM and flash memory).

  • G

    garbage collection

    Garbage collection is the systematic recovery of pooled computer storage that is being used by a program when that program no longer needs the storage.

  • gigabyte

    A gigabyte -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion bytes.

  • global namespace

    Global namespace is a feature that provides a consolidated view into multiple Network File Systems (NFS), Common Internet File Systems (CIFS), network-attached storage (NAS) systems or file servers that are in different physical locations.

  • green storage

    Green storage is the practice of using a variety of "clean energy" storage methods and products to cut down on a data center's carbon footprint, as well as cost.

  • H

    HA storage (high-availability storage)

    High-availability storage (HA storage) is a storage system that is continuously operational or provides at least 99% uptime.

  • HD-ROM (High-Density - Read Only Memory)

    HD-ROM (High-Density - Read Only Memory) is a high-capacity storage technology developed at Norsam Technologies in conjunction with an IBM research group that enables a disk to store hundreds of times as much information as a CD-ROM. HD-ROM uses a very narrow, finely-focused particle beam (charged gallium ions) to write data.

  • holographic storage (holostorage)

    Holographic storage is computer storage that uses laser beams to store computer-generated data in three dimensions.

  • hot plug

    Hot plug is the addition of a component to a running computer system without significant interruption to the operation of the system.

  • hot spare

    A hot spare, also called a hot standby, is a backup component that can be placed into service immediately when a primary component fails. 

  • I

    illumos

    Illumos is a free, open source operating system (OS) developed as a fork of Unix-based OpenSolaris, the open source community-built derivative of the Solaris OS.

  • information architecture

    In technical writing, information architecture is the set of ideas about how all information in a given context should be treated philosophically and, in a general way, how it should be organized.

  • information life cycle management (ILM)

    Information life cycle management (ILM) is a comprehensive approach to managing the flow of an information system's data and associated metadata from creation and initial storage to the time when it becomes obsolete and is deleted.

  • International Standard Recording Code (ISRC)

    The International Standard Recording Code (ISRC) is an international code used to identify sound and audio-visual recordings on compact discs (CDs), music videos, and other media, primarily to ensure royalty payments.

  • IP storage

    IP storage is a general term for several approaches to using the Internet Protocol (IP) in a storage area network (SAN) usually over Gigabit Ethernet.

  • K

    Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi, and all that

    Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi, and exbi are binary prefix multipliers that, in 1998, were approved as a standard by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in an effort to eliminate the confusion that sometimes occurs between decimal (power-of-10) and binary (power-of-2) numeration terms.

  • Kilo, mega, giga, tera, peta, exa, zetta and all that

    Kilo, mega, giga, tera, peta, exa, zetta are among the list of prefixes used to denote the quantity of something, such as a byte or bit in computing and telecommunications.

  • kilobyte (KB or Kbyte)

    A kilobyte (KB or Kbyte) is a unit of measurement for computer memory or data storage used by mathematics and computer science professionals, along with the general public, when referring to amounts of computer data using the metric system.

  • L

    legacy storage

    Legacy storage is traditional storage hardware that is older and sometimes no longer sold by its vendor.

  • LUN management

    LUN management is the process of assigning, provisioning and overseeing logical unit numbers (LUNs) across a storage environment.

  • M

    magnetoresistive head technology

    Magnetoresistive (MR) head technology is used in disk drives to allow higher storage densities than the older inductive-head technology.

  • megabyte (MB)

    As a measure of computer processor storage and real and virtual memory, a megabyte (abbreviated MB) is 2 to the 20th power bytes, or 1,048,576 bytes in decimal notation.

  • MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory)

    MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) is a way to store data bits using magnetic states instead of the electrical charges used by dynamic random access memory (DRAM).

  • MrSID (Multi-resolution Seamless Image Database)

    MrSID (Multi-resolution Seamless Image Database) is an image compressor, viewer, and file format for extremely large raster graphics images.

  • N

    NetApp Data Fabric

    The products and services that compose NetApp’s Data Fabric are designed to provide customers with the agility they need to quickly and efficiently move data to and from the cloud.

  • non-disruptive data migration

    Non-disruptive data migration is a feature that allows data movement from one storage device to another without causing downtime in the environment.

  • non-disruptive upgrade (NDU)

    A non-disruptive upgrade (NDU) is an update to software or hardware done without interruption to system service or data access.

  • non-volatile storage (NVS)

    Non-volatile storage (NVS) is a broad collection of technologies and devices that do not require a continuous power supply to retain data or program code persistently on a short- or long-term basis.

  • O

    orthogonal

    Orthogonal concepts have their roots in advanced mathematics. They are also associated with software development, storage and networking.

  • P

    parity

    Parity is a method of detecting errors in data transmissions between computers, while parity bit and parity checking are used in RAID technology to guard against data loss.

  • pipeline burst cache

    A pipeline burst cache is a cache or storage area for a computer processor that is designed to be read from or written to in a pipelining succession of four data transfers (or bursts) in which later bursts can start to flow or transfer before the first burst has arrived at the processor.

  • PLEDM (phase-state low electron drive memory)

    PLEDM (phase-state low electron drive memory) is a new memory microchip technology that offers vastly greater capacity than memory devices commonly used in the past.

  • portability

    Portability is a characteristic attributed to a computer program if it can be used in an operating systems other than the one in which it was created without requiring major rework.

  • production data

    Production data is data that is persistently stored and essential to completing day-to-day business tasks and processes.

  • protected mode

    Protected mode is a mode of program operation in a computer with an Intel-based microprocessor in which the program is restricted to addressing a specific contiguous area of 640 kilobytes.

  • Q

    Quiz: Data Storage

    Computer storage is the holding of data in an electromagnetic form for access by a computer processor.

  • R

    race condition

    A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at the same time, but because of the nature of the device or system, the operations must be done in the proper sequence to be done correctly.

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data in current use are kept so they can be quickly reached by the device's processor.

  • RAMAC (random access method of accounting and control)

    RAMAC (which stood for 'random access method of accounting and control') was the world's first computer disk storage system... (Continued)

  • RDRAM (Rambus DRAM)

    Rambus Dynamic Random Access Memory, or RDRAM (Rambus DRAM), is a type of computer device active memory developed and licensed by Rambus Inc.

  • read cache

    A read cache is a computer storage component that temporarily keeps a copy of data from a slower permanent storage location in order to accelerate the fulfillment of future requests for the data.

  • redundant

    Redundancy can have several meanings, but commonly refers to spare hardware that is kept online or to duplicate data.

  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that allows computers in a network to exchange data in main memory without involving the processor, cache or OS.

  • RIMM

    In a computer, a RIMM is a memory module developed by Kingston Technology Corp.

  • S

    shadow RAM

    Shadow RAM is a copy of Basic Input/Output Operating System (BIOS) routines from read-only memory (ROM) into a special area of random access memory (RAM) so that they can be accessed more quickly.

  • Single namespace

    A single namespace is one presentation of file system data.

  • single-electron memory (SEM)

    Single-electron memory (SEM) refers to experimental hardware technologies in which the position or presence of a single charge carrier, usually an electron, makes the difference between the logical low (0) and high (1) states in a digital system.

  • Sound Designer II (SD2)

    SDII (Sound Designer II, sometimes seen abbreviated as SD2) is a monophonic/stereophonic audio file format, originally developed by Digidesign for their Macintosh-based recording/editing products.

  • standalone dump

    A standalone dump is the copying of the contents of computer main storage (random access memory) to another storage device, usually for the purpose of debugging a programming problem.

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