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NetApp discontinues replication app

NetApp today quietly pulled the plug on its SnapMirror for Open Systems (SMOS) heterogeneous data replication software, acquired from startup Topio for $160 million in 2006.

In a press release posted on the NetApp Web site – but not distributed – the vendor said it would discontinue SMOS and close the former Topio development facility in Haifa, Israel on Jan. 15. According to the release, NetApp “has not made final employment decisions” on the 51 employees in Haifa.

NetApp acquired Topio for its Data Protection Suite, at least partly in response to EMC’s purchase of Kashya six months before. But while EMC built Kashya’s replication and CDP into RecoverPoint – a staple of its replication platform — Topio’s heterogeneous replication offering never caught on, even after NetApp re-released it as ReplicatorX and then SMOS.

NetApp’s release blames the product’s failure on a lack of interest in replication between multiple vendors’ products. “Our decision to terminate SMOS product development was based on customer priorities and actual purchase histories,” the release said. “The market for replication products for disaster recovery purposes is dominated by homogeneous, rather than multivendor, solutions. Our ‘any-to-any’ solution with SMOS was never adopted by customers in the way we anticipated.”

NetApp added that it remains committed to its other SnapMirror versions for “any-to-NetApp” data protection. SMOS customers will get three years of maintenance and technical support.

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What's the most important feature of a remote display protocol?
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User experience
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Without Wan optimization RDP is useless
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the ability to mimic both the end point for the user (function, OS specifics) as well as access to apps needed to be provisioned
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WAN perfomance is critical.
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usability of cad/acm over remote desktop
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Graphics intensive games over LAN or the tech might as well not exist.
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Multimedia, Bandwidth, USB mapping, Mic Support. All are important!
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WAN performance is most important
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If Other options are constant to compare between the solutions then Ability to deliver is the main factor to chose the best.
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Useful article. It would be helpful to see ALP, AIP and low-bandwidth X added, in a future version.
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trying to find the best protocol for wan, doing remote web browser sessions
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Hi, very good article. One quick question: does RemoteFX work with Hyper-V? does that mean that if Windows Server 2012 is installed has native OS, any remote desktop session won´t use RemoteFX?
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I must say nothing impresses me about PCOIP and their fat expensive protocol. It doesn't handle MMR on their over expensive thin clients and has no touch capability.. They rely instead on slick marketing what was VMWare and AWS thinking? True user density also relies on there offload card as the server has to work sooo hard with 100% server render. VMWare should drop PCOIP and run with framehawk for some serious WAN and user consolidation!
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I have been using Linux/KVM/Spice for VDI needs now for nearly two years. I really like SPICE. It is very fast and provides an extemely productive VDI experience. TLS security is available. USB forwarding, Auto resizing, Accelerated video, audio. It connects directly to hypervisor to provide access to the VM guest desktop, so needs no connection agent running in the VM guest. It can easily be added to a CentOS virtualization stack. Clients available for Windows and Linux. OSx client still needs a little work. There is also an embedded client for Firefox. Free to use and scale as you wish. ...Why use anything else?
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