Tip

Prepare for the future of your SAN

Prepare for the future of your SAN
John Vacca

Whether you have a SAN installed, or you are thinking about putting one in, there's one thing that most experts have to agree upon: Make sure that your options for the future are open. This tip, excerpted from InformIT,

    Requires Free Membership to View

addresses that very issue.

Not surprisingly, users have implemented SANs in different ways, but most are preparing for future growth. For example, The Motley Fool and Home Depot use Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop (FCAL) and will need to migrate to a switched fabric architecture before they can add any more servers, clients, or applications to their SANs.

Users agree, though, that relying on a systems vendor or integrator for your first SAN implementation is the wise route. You should also expect your vendor to guarantee interoperability between Fibre Channel and Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) devices.

It is reasonable to choose a vendor to implement a limited package. It is also unlikely that a vendor would be able to completely understand business applications and where a midsize to large business is going.

The plan for a data infrastructure closely parallels the network and systems infrastructure. Blending the three into a single cohesive network is necessary to the planning. That way, storage becomes another infrastructure resource that users can manage. This strategy also helps ensure network, applications, and other groups in the enterprise network environment interoperate.

Successful SAN implementation also depends in large part on getting the approval of management. For example, most SAN deployments are just the start of a much larger SAN implementation that management has approved and provided the funds for.

Ensuring that you get a properly funded program and a disciplined investment plan rather than budgeting in fits and starts is important. You don't want the first application to have to bear all the cost. You need to think about planning for this, investing in it, and then allocating the cost back to the business across multiple applications.


To read the entire article from which this tip is excerpted, click over to InformIT. You have to register there, but the registration is free.


This was first published in July 2002

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

Disclaimer: Our Tips Exchange is a forum for you to share technical advice and expertise with your peers and to learn from other enterprise IT professionals. TechTarget provides the infrastructure to facilitate this sharing of information. However, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or validity of the material submitted. You agree that your use of the Ask The Expert services and your reliance on any questions, answers, information or other materials received through this Web site is at your own risk.