Tip

Check the settings on your NAS filer

Check the settings on your NAS filer
Rick Cook

Watch your NAS filer settings. Don't compromise security when you install a filer.

Although NAS filers can be installed in a matter of minutes, you still need to take a few minutes more to make sure security permissions are set appropriately. Many NAS filers arrive set so that all clients have full access to all files -- minimum security, in other words. This may not be what you want, especially if your system is connected to the Internet. Best practice is to allow clients access to only the files they need and to further restrict access and read/write privileges based on groups of individual users.

Since a NAS filer appears to the system as a single large storage device you can use the file access features built into the client operating system to control access. Many NAS servers are designed to take advantage of established security settings. For Windows systems, this means using the NT Domain Controller to get a user and group list for authenticating users and using pass through authentication for global users and groups from the domain controller, for example. Netware and Unix or Linux users can use the file access features built into their respective operating systems as well.

Snap Appliances has a summary on security settings for NAS filers (especially the company's products) at

Requires Free Membership to View

www.snapappliances.com/security.asp.

Rick Cook has been writing about mass storage since the days when the term meant an 80K floppy disk. The computers he learned on used ferrite cores and magnetic drums. For the last twenty years he has been a freelance writer specializing in storage and other computer issues.

Did you like this tip? Whether you did or not, why not let us know. Drop us an e-mail and sound off.

Related Book

Building Storage Networks, Second Edition
Author : Marc Farley
Publisher : Osborne
Published : May 2001
Summary:
Develop and design successful storage systems using this in-depth resource, now in a completely revised second edition. Covering everything from basic fundamentals--such as I/O components and file systems to emerging topics such as i-SCSI and DAFS--this complete book delivers the background information and technical know-how to implement large-capacity, high-availability storage networks throughout your enterprise. Filled with diagrams and easy-to-understand explanations, you will be able to identify and apply network storage technology to best meet the needs of your organization.


This was first published in August 2001

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

Disclaimer: Our Tips Exchange is a forum for you to share technical advice and expertise with your peers and to learn from other enterprise IT professionals. TechTarget provides the infrastructure to facilitate this sharing of information. However, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or validity of the material submitted. You agree that your use of the Ask The Expert services and your reliance on any questions, answers, information or other materials received through this Web site is at your own risk.