Oracle

Storage access speeds News

  • May 20, 2016 20 May'16

    Dell launches new storage OS; and a peep inside the bunker

    In the context of the proposed Dell-EMC purchase, Dell has announced an upgrade to its (Compellent-derived) Storage Center operating system (OS), to version 7. Noteworthy in it is the ability for ...

  • April 05, 2016 05 Apr'16

    Intel NVMe SSD launch targets growing cloud storage

    Intel's PCIe-attached NVMe drive families include one for server-side enterprise apps and another to replace SATA SSDs in cloud environments.

  • March 31, 2016 31 Mar'16

    HPE launches NVDIMM, NVMe Persistent Memory products

    Gen9 ProLiant storage servers are the focus of HPE's Persistent Memory product launch, including an 8 GB NVDIMM module and a family of PCIe NVMe flash drives.

  • March 29, 2016 29 Mar'16

    NetApp prepares SANtricity for Splunk

    NetApp today rolled out an upgraded version of its SANtricity software for its E and EF Series of high performance arrays, with the focus on making Splunk and other data analytics applications run ...

View All News

Storage access speeds Get Started

Bring yourself up to speed with our introductory content

View All Get Started

Evaluate Storage access speeds Vendors & Products

Weigh the pros and cons of technologies, products and projects you are considering.

  • Understand the differences between all-flash array vendors

    Learn the nuances of solid state storage and how to vet all-flash storage array vendors in a time of innovations like triple-level cell NAND and nonvolatile memory express. Continue Reading

  • How to measure flash storage's true value

    Flash storage, or using the broader term, solid-state storage, suffers from an inadequate measure of value. Flash storage provides a step-function improvement in the ability to store and retrieve ... Continue Reading

  • Learn how to assess all-flash array vendors

    Arrays loaded with flash drives are the speed kings of storage arrays. They can also be more expensive than traditional systems with hard disk drives (HDDs), so IT managers need to assess their application needs to make the best decision among all-flash array vendors.

    Cheap HDDs give traditional arrays an advantage in price per GB, but systems equipped only with more costly flash drives can provide a significant edge in price per IOPS. Hybrid arrays combining HDDs and solid-state drives (SSDs) are yet another option to consider when balancing the price-performance equation.

    Points of comparison for IT organizations weighing the various options from all-flash array (AFA) vendors include IOPS, latency, throughput, raw and usable capacity, flash type, networking options, architecture type (scale-up vs. scale-out), and supported storage features, such as data deduplication and compression, thin provisioning, snapshots, replication and encryption.

    The original use case for AFAs was typically to accelerate the performance of a niche application with high I/O requirements. AFAs have since become more popular for primary storage, running multiple application workloads on a single flash array now that the products offer the capacity, management and storage capabilities to put them on par with HDD-based systems.

    The use of denser, less expensive flash, such as multi-level cell and triple-level cell 3D NAND, and data reduction technologies are giving rise to claims from AFA vendors that their products can match or beat the price of high-end storage arrays equipped with the fastest spinning disks. So IT organizations need to compare the features and capabilities of many of the leading AFAs against specific criteria to select the right AFA to meet their technical and business needs.

     Continue Reading

View All Evaluate

Manage Storage access speeds

Learn to apply best practices and optimize your operations.

  • Storage may be to blame for that I/O bottleneck

    A disk I/O bottleneck, resource contention, misconfigurations and other problems will degrade the performance of virtual machines. When too many VMs are competing for limited resources, results will inevitably suffer. This chapter looks at tactics that can help to combat these types of bottlenecks, particularly those stemming from the storage components of a virtualized environment. The effort it takes to solve storage I/O bottlenecks is considerable. Variables range from physical infrastructure choices to configuration changes. The starting point for solving your I/O problems will be VM monitoring and establishing baseline performance. From there, you can scrutinize read IOPS vs. write IOPS, network cards, and other specific points that are likely contributing to the I/O bottlenecks. With the right approach, a willingness to become a virtual machine monitor and the use of proper technologies, admins can solve the problems causing an infrastructure's performance to suffer. Continue Reading

  • Hospital data protection policy must bond storage and mobile

    The secure handling of mobile data -- and related information protection requirements from HIPAA -- leads to the need for examining a healthcare organization's storage technology. Continue Reading

  • Solid-state drive costs: What factors do I need to consider?

    SSD costs are on the downswing, but users need to explore the price per IOPS and price per gigabyte before purchasing. Some workloads aren't a match with the technology. Continue Reading

View All Manage

Problem Solve Storage access speeds Issues

We’ve gathered up expert advice and tips from professionals like you so that the answers you need are always available.

View All Problem Solve

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchSolidStateStorage

SearchVirtualStorage

SearchCloudStorage

SearchDisasterRecovery

SearchDataBackup

Close