Article

Legato, Compaq take the guesswork out of backup

Kevin Komiega

Compaq Computer Corp., and Legato Systems Inc., have a cure for the common backup headache.

Legato, a Mountain View, Calif.-based storage management software developer is teaming with Houston-headquartered Compaq's Global Services organization to implement backup solutions for storage customers using Legato NetWorker.

With the new Compaq/Legato SAN Backup implementation CarePaq Services, companies no longer need in-house expertise to configure, install and test the Legato NetWorker product.

Taking the installation out of the customer's hands guarantees that the Compaq SAN will work with Legato NetWorker to protect customer data, Compaq said.

Compaq said many of its current customers use Legato as their data protection software. Legato products are tested and certified as part of Compaq's Enterprise Backup Solution. Proper installation, the companies said, ensures that will get the most out of their storage investment.

"With this solution, the customer knows that the Legato software that they have purchased will be deployed to work within theironment," said Greg Clock, vice president, Consulting Services, Legato Systems.

Clock said the new SAN backup configuration from Compaq and Legato was spawned by the heightened interest around data protection and backup and recovery after Sept. 11.

Clock sees a window of opportunity of six months before the importance of disaster recovery returns to the afterthought that it was

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prior to September.

"In six months people will go right back to [tightening their wallets] when it comes to [disaster recovery] DR," he said.

Enterprise Management Associates analyst Mike Karp said visibility of the importance of disaster recovery is higher than it has ever been.

But, he said, regardless of the circumstances, a good CIO understands the need for disaster recovery planning.

"The larger the company, the higher the likelihood they will implement a disaster recovery plan," said Karp.

Jamie Gruener, senior analyst for Boston-based analyst firm the Yankee Group, said the buzz around disaster recovery is just getting started.

"If anything, I think this market has a much longer acceleration path that will see a lot of growth in 2002 and 2003," Gruener said. "Six months is just a ramping period for this market, and I think a fair amount of storage spending in 2002 will be tied to disaster recovery planning."

Let us know what you think about the story, e-mail Kevin Komiega, assistant news editor

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Implementing a SAN for backup

Storage Management Strategies and Applications

LEGATO/VERITAS differences

Leading online backup providers

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