HDS Topic Takeover on Solid State Storage Info Center - SearchStorage.com

HDS Topic Takeover on Solid State Storage

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  • Choosing the correct laptop SSDAnswer - Leah Schoeb, partner with Evaluator Group, discusses the important considerations for selecting the right laptop SSD.
  • Adding SSD to a tiered storage systemAnswer - Find out whether you need to invest in new management software when adding SSD to a tiered storage system in this Expert Response from Marc Staimer.
  • Best practices for SSD technologiesFeature - No longer a luxury item for well-heeled data centers, SSD technologies are more affordable than ever and come in a variety of form factors with a choice of deployment options.
  • Define SSD: Top terms you need to knowFeature - How do you define SSD? Check out this list of important SSD terms. The list includes terms you should know and some that may seem obscure.

Laptop SSD, desktop SSD, and other implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

  • Almost time for SSD flash storage to be used with object storage

    Feature -As the price of flash SSD storage continues to fall, it becomes more attractive for object storage, which otherwise counts on big, slow and cheap HDDs.

  • 3.5" SSD (3.5 solid-state drive)

    Definition -A 3.5 solid-state drive (SSD) is a data storage device designed for the 3.5-inch hard disk drive (HDD) form factor. It fits into the drive slot as a same-sized HDD in a portable computer, enterprise server, or storage system.

  • HDD form factor (hard disk drive form factor)

    Definition -HDD form factor is the size or geometry of a hard disk drive, determining the device’s compatibility with the drive bays in a storage array or enclosure, server, portable computer or other computing device.

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SSD array implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

  • IBM flash storage expands with midrange all-flash products

    News -IBM's all-flash portfolio grows, with a new midrange and entry-level option, and the vendor adds a migration program aimed at EMC-Dell customers.

  • HPE StoreVirtual entry-level arrays get makeover, price cut

    News -HPE StoreVirtual and MSA entry-level storage have new flash and hybrid models with lower prices as the vendor tries to expand its footprint outside of its enterprise 3PAR storage.

  • Best bets for modernizing legacy storage systems

    E-Handbook -Traditionally, storage arrays were purchased on three- to five-year contracts, but modern budgets often require companies to keep their arrays for seven years. With the pace at which data storage technology changes today, 7-year-old legacy storage systems can be considered ancient. But you can use the latest data storage technology to keep up to date. For instance, most legacy storage systems today support new media types as they come out. That means you can drastically expand a system's capacity and even performance by using higher-density drives or by replacing hard disk drives with solid-state drives.

    Software-defined storage can also be used to extend the life of arrays, especially SDS that supports commodity hardware. SDS can run on top of older arrays to deliver more efficient and newer data management capabilities.

    Older large arrays can also be complemented by flash caching devices or software that improves performance. And instead of buying a new SAN or NAS system, a company can add a smaller-capacity hyper-converged appliance or all-flash array for a specific application -- such as virtual desktops. The cloud can also be used to push off new array purchases and keep utilization down on legacy storage systems. Companies can move applications such as archiving that do not require great performance off to a public cloud.

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SSD utility and application tools from searchSolidStateStorage.com

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Solid state storage technology from searchSolidStateStorage.com

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Solid state cache appliance implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

  • Server-side caching defined and clarified

    E-Handbook -Server-side caching, or flash storage installed in the server itself, is deployed to accelerate application performance. Placing the flash as close to the application as possible reduces latency and improves performance.

    Over the past couple of years, there has been a lot of development in this area, and today, there are a number of ways that you can insert flash storage into a server. For example, you can use SATA form factor SSDs that install in place of traditional hard disk drives. Or you can use flash storage that connects directly to the PCIe bus. An emerging option is to attach flash storage directly to the server's memory channel via dual in-line memory module (DIMM) slots. Each, of course, comes with strengths and weaknesses.

    There are also a variety of standards emerging for server-side caching that are important to understand when selecting a product.

    This Drill Down on server-side flash will compare and contrast the variety of ways that you can deploy the technology today to help readers better understand the pros and cons to each approach. It will also explain when server-side caching is a better (or worse) alternative to an all-flash or hybrid-flash storage array. There's so much going on in this space today that it can be hard to stay on top of it all. This Drill Down will help.

  • Are cache appliances losing prevalence in the market?

    Answer -As flash technologies and public cloud storage become increasingly common in enterprises, caching appliances on hard disk drives may soon become outdated.

  • SSD cache performance: What is the state of the market?

    Answer -SSD caching is included with a majority of products, so vendors have turned their resources toward maximizing throughput and endurance. Discover the issues behind the innovations.

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Server-based SSD implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

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NAS (network attached storage) from searchStorage.com

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