HDS Topic Takeover On Solid State Storage VA Info Center - SearchStorage.com

HDS Topic Takeover On Solid State Storage VA

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Laptop SSD, desktop SSD, and other implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

  • 3.5" SSD (3.5 solid-state drive)

    Definition -A 3.5 solid-state drive (SSD) is a data storage device designed for the 3.5-inch hard disk drive (HDD) form factor. It fits into the drive slot as a same-sized HDD in a portable computer, enterprise server, or storage system.

  • HDD form factor (hard disk drive form factor)

    Definition -HDD form factor is the size or geometry of a hard disk drive, determining the device’s compatibility with the drive bays in a storage array or enclosure, server, portable computer or other computing device.

  • SanDisk boosts CloudSpeed Ultra SSDs for hyperscale

    News -SanDisk upgrades CloudSpeed Ultra SATA SSD, the highest performing SSD of its CloudSpeed family of drives for enterprises and cloud use.

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SSD array implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

  • Learn how to assess all-flash array vendors

    E-Handbook -Arrays loaded with flash drives are the speed kings of storage arrays. They can also be more expensive than traditional systems with hard disk drives (HDDs), so IT managers need to assess their application needs to make the best decision among all-flash array vendors.

    Cheap HDDs give traditional arrays an advantage in price per GB, but systems equipped only with more costly flash drives can provide a significant edge in price per IOPS. Hybrid arrays combining HDDs and solid-state drives (SSDs) are yet another option to consider when balancing the price-performance equation.

    Points of comparison for IT organizations weighing the various options from all-flash array (AFA) vendors include IOPS, latency, throughput, raw and usable capacity, flash type, networking options, architecture type (scale-up vs. scale-out), and supported storage features, such as data deduplication and compression, thin provisioning, snapshots, replication and encryption.

    The original use case for AFAs was typically to accelerate the performance of a niche application with high I/O requirements. AFAs have since become more popular for primary storage, running multiple application workloads on a single flash array now that the products offer the capacity, management and storage capabilities to put them on par with HDD-based systems.

    The use of denser, less expensive flash, such as multi-level cell and triple-level cell 3D NAND, and data reduction technologies are giving rise to claims from AFA vendors that their products can match or beat the price of high-end storage arrays equipped with the fastest spinning disks. So IT organizations need to compare the features and capabilities of many of the leading AFAs against specific criteria to select the right AFA to meet their technical and business needs.

  • Reduxio CEO asserts all-flash will not rule primary storage

    News -Hybrid storage startup's CEO says all-flash or 'all-anything' will not rule primary storage; he foresees a mix of technologies with different classes of service.

  • Pivot3 vStac SLX hyper-convergence includes NexGen technology

    News -Pivot 3's hyper-converged platform expanded with the vStac SLX targeted at VMware environments. The new system incorporates NexGen Storage PCIe flash and quality of service.

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SSD utility and application tools from searchSolidStateStorage.com

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Solid state storage technology from searchSolidStateStorage.com

  • Learn how to assess all-flash array vendors

    E-Handbook -Arrays loaded with flash drives are the speed kings of storage arrays. They can also be more expensive than traditional systems with hard disk drives (HDDs), so IT managers need to assess their application needs to make the best decision among all-flash array vendors.

    Cheap HDDs give traditional arrays an advantage in price per GB, but systems equipped only with more costly flash drives can provide a significant edge in price per IOPS. Hybrid arrays combining HDDs and solid-state drives (SSDs) are yet another option to consider when balancing the price-performance equation.

    Points of comparison for IT organizations weighing the various options from all-flash array (AFA) vendors include IOPS, latency, throughput, raw and usable capacity, flash type, networking options, architecture type (scale-up vs. scale-out), and supported storage features, such as data deduplication and compression, thin provisioning, snapshots, replication and encryption.

    The original use case for AFAs was typically to accelerate the performance of a niche application with high I/O requirements. AFAs have since become more popular for primary storage, running multiple application workloads on a single flash array now that the products offer the capacity, management and storage capabilities to put them on par with HDD-based systems.

    The use of denser, less expensive flash, such as multi-level cell and triple-level cell 3D NAND, and data reduction technologies are giving rise to claims from AFA vendors that their products can match or beat the price of high-end storage arrays equipped with the fastest spinning disks. So IT organizations need to compare the features and capabilities of many of the leading AFAs against specific criteria to select the right AFA to meet their technical and business needs.

  • Buyer's checklist to hybrid flash arrays

    E-Handbook -All-flash arrays are a hot technology, but not everybody needs flash for all of their storage. Hybrid flash arrays can strike a balance between using flash for performance while keeping spinning disk drives to lower the price for less frequently accessed data. Flash storage offers blazing speed but at a high cost per gigabyte.

    At the other end of the spectrum, multi-terabyte hard disk drives (HDDs) are more economical, but they do not supply the raw IOPS per drive that some applications need. Hybrid flash arrays combining HDDs and a thin slice of flash storage can provide a performance boost and reduce latency while keeping costs in check. Although the difference between HDD prices and flash costs has narrowed considerably, many organizations still don't have the budget to deploy hundreds of terabytes of solid-state storage. Despite differences in architectures, the vendors generally agree on some hybrid vs. all-flash guidelines. If sub-millisecond latency or guaranteed quality of service (QoS) is required, then an all-flash array or a hybrid flash array that can deliver near all-flash performance is the way to go. But with variable and unpredictable workloads, hybrid flash arrays can often serve the need at a lower $/GB.

    Candidates for hybrid flash arrays include collaboration, email and any applications where data lifecycle issues mean that not all data requires immediate access.

  • Tegile, Pure take steps to make flash upgrades easier

    News -Tegile Systems and Pure Storage are pushing more cost-effective flash upgrade programs that are customized for the IT utility model for all-flash arrays.

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Solid state cache appliance implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

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Server-based SSD implementations from searchSolidStateStorage.com

  • HPE, Western Digital launch VMware VSAN-based flash node

    News -Western Digital is bringing out flash storage products based on SanDisk technology. It partnered with HPE and VMware on a VSAN-based node, adding Flash Virtualization System.

  • Server-side flash storage technology basks in spotlight

    Feature -Dennis Martin walks you through the flash technology advancements that are helping make server-side storage challenges a thing of the past.

  • Server-side flash technology lifts solid-state adoption

    E-Zine -Server-side solid-state storage is more ubiquitous than ever due to growing capacities and rapidly dropping flash technology prices. There are a many ways to install flash technology in a server, though there are decisions to make before you buy. We examine flash technology form factors, interfaces, protocols and capacities, as well as use cases, advantages and limitations.

    Disk-based backups revolutionized data protection. While far more expensive to deploy and maintain than tape, a growing list of vendors are consolidating backup with other secondary storage requirements into appliances that make disk-based backup more cost-effective.

    Although tape may no longer be the storage medium of choice for backup and disaster recovery, it still has a solid place in enterprises as an archive tier and as a transportation and sharing format for certain industries. In this issue of Storage magazine, we explore the state of the art of tape and its potential use cases today.

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NAS (network attached storage) from searchStorage.com

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