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Access "Virtualize disaster recovery"

Published: 17 Oct 2012

Virtualizing storage and servers can make disaster recovery easier, more flexible and less expensive. By Eric Siebert Designing and implementing a disaster recovery (DR) infrastructure is often complicated, expensive and challenging. Virtualization technologies -- for both storage and servers -- can help reduce the expense with unique approaches that differ from traditional DR methods and can provide increased flexibility and responsiveness. Server virtualization encapsulates an entire server into a single file, which makes transporting it to other locations much easier. Storage virtualization presents multiple storage devices as a single storage resource, which helps hide some of the back-end complexities of the storage devices and network. Either of these virtualization technologies will ease the implementation of a DR plan; used together, they can provide a very effective DR strategy. For most companies, the type of DR environment they devise is typically determined by balancing the amount of money they have to spend on one-time and ongoing costs, with ... Access >>>

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Features
    • Quality Awards V enterprise arrays: NetApp alone at the top

      In the last Quality Awards for enterprise arrays, NetApp and EMC finished in a dead-heat for first place. This time, NetApp ekes out a narrow victory over archrival EMC.

    • Virtualize disaster recovery

      Virtualization can save you money, time and effort, and make the often daunting task of designing and implementing a DR plan easier. But there are related challenges and costs.

    • Top new features of backup apps by W. Curtis Preston

      We look at some of the key backup technology advancements and describe how four leading backup vendors--CommVault, EMC, IBM and Symantec--have implemented these technologies.

    • Beginning of the end for hard drives?

      Enterprise-ready solid-state storage hasn't been around for long, but 33% of our respondents have solid state running. Price is still an issue, but disk's days may be numbered.

  • Columns
    • Could 2010 be a breakout year for scale-out NAS architecture? by Terri McClure

      Scale-out NAS is generally a more efficient option than traditional scale-up architectures. But technology change introduces risk, and companies may not be ready for a switch.

    • No more wasted tiers

      Tony Asaro explores intelligent tiered storage, which is becoming a necessity for many firms due to the massive amounts of data they're storing.

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