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Vol. 4 No. 9 November 2005

Storage salaries increase

Salaries in 2005 are better than last year and there's optimism that salaries in 2006 will average a modest 3% increase, according to Storage magazine's exclusive storage salary survey. 2005 should go down as a pretty good year for the IT industry as well as storage professionals. Respondents to Storage's survey report that salaries, on average, have increased as they did in 2004 and in 2003 (the first year of Storage's annual survey). And respondents are already anticipating salary increases for next year (see "Survey methodology" and "Storage professional profile"). Percentage of companies with dedicated storage groups, by revenue For now, it appears the industry can expect steady, albeit modest, salary growth based on the three annual Storage salary surveys to date, in which respondents have consistently reported single-digit increases over the previous year. The more interesting story, however, may be the growing respect for storage that's implicit in the survey. If money equals attention and respect, then storage is getting...

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Features in this issue

  • Quality Awards: What are the best midrange arrays?

    Midrange array users are a generally satisfied group, according to the latest Diogenes Labs-Storage magazine Quality Awards survey. While all midrange array vendors fared quite well in this third installment of our awards program, the vendor that snared top honors might surprise some people.

  • Easing away from ESCON

    by  Alex Barrett

    ESCON, the protocol that pre-dated FICON as a systems-to-storage connection, is incompatible with the newer FICON-based systems. This tip looks at various ways you can tackle this dilemma.

  • Secure your backups

    The headlines tell the story: Lost tapes can jeopardize the confidentiality of personal information and cause public-relations woes for those companies charged with safeguarding that data. Encryption can solve the problem, but implementing tape encryption isn't so easy, as performance issues could impact backup windows.

Columns in this issue

SearchSolidStateStorage

SearchVirtualStorage

SearchCloudStorage

SearchDisasterRecovery

SearchDataBackup

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