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Access "Exchange 2007 replication: A stretch for DR"

Published: 20 Oct 2012

Exchange Server 2007's new Cluster Continuous Replication (CCR) feature promises higher availability and improved failover capabilities. But implementing CCR as part of a disaster recovery (DR) scenario could be prohibitively expensive for many companies setting up remote DR sites. CCR, in addition to Exchange's other new replication feature, Local Continuous Replication (LCR), asynchronously creates copies of storage groups and updates them via log shipping and replay functionality. Whereas LCR continuously replicates data across multiple disks within the same server, CCR replicates within a cluster from an active server to a passive one. Because Exchange 2007 allows each server to have its own storage rather than sharing within a cluster, they can be separated, theoretically, over long distances. But to deploy CCR, several requirements must be met, including having all cluster nodes on the same IP subnet. While it's possible to set up virtual LANs, Microsoft requires, at minimum, a point-to-point, roundtrip latency of less than half a second. That level of... Access >>>

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