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Vol. 9 Num. 10 February 2011

What you should know about global dedupe

Global data deduplication can yield significant capacity savings, but its most attractive feature may be the architecture it's built upon. The buzz around data deduplication continues unabated. Based on our experience, many IT users have already deployed data deduplication to some extent in their data centers. And many of those who haven't taken the dedupe plunge are planning to in 2011. Still, we estimate that only approximately 20% of worldwide enterprise data is protected on disk, with another 50% still to be added to that number. The rest will stay on tape or remain unprotected. But even as shops enjoy the benefits of dedupe, some are beginning to worry about the proliferation of secondary disks. And many of those are wondering if global deduplication might actually deliver more efficiency across large amounts of data. But before we get into global data deduplication, let me define data deduplication itself, especially in contrast to primary storage optimization (PSO). The term data deduplication has become so overused that ...

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Features in this issue

  • Finalists: 2010 data storage Products of the Year

    Find out which products were chosen as finalists in the 2010 storage Products of the Year competition by Storage magazine and SearchStorage.com.

  • Replication revisited

    Once an expensive option, data replication is now available in many forms and is a more affordable and effective disaster recovery option than ever.

  • Storage managers plan for busy 2011

    Based on our annual Storage Priorities Survey, it looks like a busy year -- storage budgets are up a bit and there are long to-do lists.

  • Using NAS for virtual machines

    Common wisdom says you need block storage for virtual servers; but with most hypervisors supporting the NFS protocol, NAS may work just as well.

Columns in this issue

SearchSolidStateStorage

SearchVirtualStorage

SearchCloudStorage

SearchDisasterRecovery

SearchDataBackup

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