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Access "Making sense of the alphabet soup of server-attached storage"

Phil Goodwin Published: 01 May 2014

There's no shortage of buzz about networking server-attached storage to create new networks from existing DAS, SAN and NAS. See if it's right for your shop. The recent proliferation of available storage technologies has led to an abundance of choices for storage architects to select from when building their ideal solutions. Product differentiation gives users distinct options, which has long been the case for storage managers. However, gone are the days of a clear distinction between DAS, NAS and SAN -- traditionally considered the three pillars of enterprise storage—as software-defined storage gains interest. An analogy might be a color wheel where blue, red and yellow are unique. The addition of software-defined storage (SDS), data-defined storage (DDS) and object storage takes attributes from the base "colors" and blends them to create a spectrum of storage technologies. While this increases IT consumer choice, it also leads to confusion as to where one technology starts and another ends. In addition, vendors may eschew technological purity and adopt ... Access >>>

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