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Access "Disaster Recovery Extra: Editorial"

Published: 20 Oct 2012

DR planning isn't for the faint of heart TAKE THE STRESS induced by managing daily backup operations and crank it up a few turns. If that kind of angst is uneasily familiar, you're probably working on your company's disaster recovery (DR) plan. And if you're responsible for the DR plan, you're undoubtedly discovering new frontiers of anxiety. Like it or not, DR planning is a fact of life for storage managers. Too much has happened in the past few years for any company to have an "it couldn't happen to us" attitude. Playing the odds is just too big a gamble—few companies could withstand being out of touch with their data for a very long time. While there are significant differences between backup and DR, having a firm grasp on the former can give you a leg up on crafting a strategy to deal with the massive outages that could occur during a disaster. Many of the techniques used to safeguard data on a daily basis come into play, but there's still far more to be done. DR requires the participation of all IT factions, as well as business units, senior management,... Access >>>

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    • Disaster Recovery Extra: Editorial

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      Storage tiers are the first step toward true information lifecycle management. But they're only a small step—the key to ILM success is aligning your data with its business value.

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      2005 was a big year for storage security, with major vendors doing more than just paying lip service. Vendors are beginning to integrate security into new products or add encryption capabilities. But there's a lot more to do in 2006 to build a secure storage infrastructure.

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