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Access "Data classification is end users' job"

Alex Barrett, Trends Editor, Storage Published: 20 Oct 2012

Forget about automated information lifecycle management (ILM). Before one Fortune 500 biosciences firm ventures into ILM or tiered storage, end users will first have to classify all of the files they've generated over the years, says Michael Masterson, information systems architect at the firm. Without a proper data classification, he said, "ILM is putting the cart before the horse. "IT can't classify those files," Masterson added. "They're not the information owners." To that Related articles Buyer's Guide: Data classification tools Users get mixed results tiering storage Data classification: Getting started end, the firm is training users on and Abrevity Inc. FileData Manager, which supplies them with an interface for tagging files similar to the way in which Apple Computer Inc.'s iTunes lets you create Playlists. Once data is tagged appropriately, "ILM is downhill," he noted and just a simple question of data movement. The Abrevity tool is the first one Masterson has seen that can capture a file's context. "It's unique in its ability to capture [file] ... Access >>>

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