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Vol. 2 No. 5 July 2003

Serial ATA Adoption Ramping Up

Go to your local computer retailer and you can now buy a serial ATA (SATA) drive. Go online, and you can buy just about everything else: motherboards, cases, RAID controllers, cables, adapters and power supplies. And even though the SATA ramp up has been somewhat slow, it's starting to feel like the beginning of the end for parallel ATA. Already, this spring, ATA RAID and subsystem vendor Promise Technology announced its last ever parallel ATA product, the UltraTrak RM15000, a 3U RAID array. It will continue to manufacture existing parallel ATA products, but according to a Promise spokesman, "from here on out, all Promise products will be SATA." Promise has 87% market share of the host-bus ATA RAID controller market, according to Gartner Dataquest. Startups, meanwhile, are designing new arrays with SATA drives "out of the shoot," says Eric Schou, senior product marketing manager at ATA drive manufacturer Maxtor. Case in point is EqualLogic, which recently announced the availability of its PeerStorage Array 100E, a clustered ...

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Features in this issue

  • Close the IM Loophole

    NYSE sends message about instant messages

  • Roll Your Own NAS

    Is building your own NAS better?

  • Taming HBAs

    by  Jerome Wendt

    Installing, configuring and maintaining Fibre Channel host bus adapters (HBAs) is the bane of many SAN administrators. Thankfully, these new cards offer better management tools.

  • Creating a large e-mail system

    by  Jim Booth

    Here's how one storage team transformed a monolithic storage design into a flexible, scalable system.

  • IP SANs take their place

    There's a growing interest in using IP for storage in small to midsized enterprises, although Fibre Channel is still dominant in large organizations. What's right for you: IP, FC or a combination of both?

Columns in this issue

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