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Vol. 4 No. 8 October 2005

Safer SATA for nearline apps

For nearline applications like backup and archiving, any old SATA disk drive won't do, say vendors; you want a drive that has been tested using workloads that approximate the actual environments it will be used in. Seagate's NL35 drive, in qualifications with interested channels, "fits the standard definition of SATA in terms of performance, but it's rated in a nearline workload," says Pete Steege, Seagate's senior product manager for enterprise storage. That means that unlike desktop drives, which are frequently powered up and down, the NL35 is rated to a continuous 1 million hour meantime before failure (MTBF) rate. Another NL35 feature is workload management, which monitors the drive, throttles it if it's being overused and issues read-after-write commands. That reduces wear on the head, Steege says, and "ensures that what you wrote is really there." Improved error-recovery control, meanwhile, prevents drives from being taken out of commission prematurely. SATA drives can sometimes heal common errors on their own, but ...

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Features in this issue

  • Hidden threats to data

    Inadequacies in storage governance and weaknesses in data management may pose far less-visible risks to a company's data. To mitigate these threats, you must be aware of the impact and probability of these risks to reduce or eliminate them.

  • Safer SATA for nearline apps

    New SATA drivers tailored for nearline apps

  • Keep remote offices in sync

    With regulatory compliance, data protection requirements and the need to share data, remote office data can no longer be ignored. Wide-area file system products can rein in and protect remote data.

  • Will your disaster recovery plan work?

    No matter how many checklists a company creates, the number of disaster scenarios it considers or even how assiduously it backs up data, managers can't be confident in their firm's ability to recover data unless the systems have been tested thoroughly.

  • Better capacity forecasting

    There are two methods for devising storage capacity forecasts: quantitative and qualitative. By combining the two, you can develop practical metrics that will make more accurate forecasts.

  • Data grids for storage

    Data grids are used by the scientific community to access data resources around the world. Companies can use the principles underlying these global grids to link geographically dispersed sites.

Columns in this issue

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