Solid-state storage Definitions

  • #

    3.5" SSD (3.5 solid-state drive)

    A 3.5 solid-state drive (SSD) is a data storage device designed for the 3.5-inch hard disk drive (HDD) form factor. It fits into the drive slot as a same-sized HDD in a portable computer, enterprise server, or storage system.

  • 3D NAND flash

    3D NAND is a type of flash memory in which memory cells are stacked vertically in layers, in comparison to planar NAND, which uses a single layer of memory cells.

  • 3D XPoint

    3D XPoint is memory storage technology jointly developed by Intel and Micron Technology Inc.

  • A

    all-flash array

    An all-flash array is a solid state storage disk system that contains multiple flash memory drives instead of spinning hard disk drives. A flash array can transfer data to and from solid state drives (SSDs) much faster than hard disk drives.

  • array-based memory

    Array-based memory is an evolving solid-state storage technology similar to flash memory but with potentially greater storage capacity. The increased capacity results from the fact that array-based memory is three-dimensional (3D) while most traditional memory and storage media are two-dimensional (2D)... (Continued)

  • array-based SSD

    An array-based SSD is a solid state drive manufactured in a form factor that can be installed in a typical storage array.

  • B

    byte

    In most computer systems, a byte is a unit of data that is eight binary digits long. Bytes are often used to represent a character such as a letter, number or typographic symbol.

  • C

    cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is random access memory (RAM) that a computer microprocessor can access more quickly than it can access regular RAM.

  • client solid state drive (SSD)

    Client solid state drive (SSD) is a marketing term used by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and value-added resellers (VARs) to differentiate between solid state drives built for consumers and solid state drives built for the enterprise.

  • column address strobe

    In computer memory technology, CAS (column address strobe) is a signal sent to a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) that tells it that an associated address is a column address. A data bit in DRAM is stored in a cell located by the intersection of a column address and a row address. A RAS (row address strobe) signal is used to validate the row address.

  • CompactFlash card (CF card)

    A CompactFlash card (CF card) is a memory card format developed by SanDisk in 1994 that uses flash memory technology to store data on a very small portable device.

  • conductive metal-oxide (CMOx) technology

    Conductive metal-oxide (CMOx) technology is a nonvolatile storage technology that works by moving oxygen ions between conductive and insulating metal-oxide layers within a single chip.

  • D

    DAT USB drive

    A DAT USB drive is a tape drive with digital audio tape (DAT) that can be plugged into a Universal Serial Bus (USB) connection as a simple and relatively low-cost way to back up data routinely, especially on servers. DAT USB technology is expected to make it easier and more affordable for small and medium-size businesses, as well as for larger enterprise data centers, to perform backup and restore operations.

  • E

    eMMC (embedded MultiMediaCard)

    An embedded MultiMediaCard (eMMC) is a small storage device made up of NAND flash memory and a simple storage controller.

  • enterprise MLC (eMLC)

    Enterprise MLC (eMLC) is a type of MLC flash that has been enhanced to accommodate more write cycles than consumer-grade MLC flash offers.

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