Definition

JBOD (just a bunch of disks or just a bunch of drives)

Contributor(s): Brien Posey, Paul Rowlands

JBOD (which stands for "just a bunch of disks") generally refers to a collection of hard disks that have not been configured to act as a redundant array of independent disks (RAID) array.

RAID arrays write data across multiple disks as a way of storing data redundantly (to achieve fault tolerance) or to stripe data across multiple disks to get better performance than any one disk could provide on its own. Typically, a RAID array will appear to the operating system as a single disk.

JBOD is an alternative to using a RAID configuration. Rather than configuring a storage array to use a RAID level, the disks within the array are either spanned or treated as independent disks. Spanning configurations use a technique called concatenation to combine the capacity of all of the disks into a single, large logical disk. Although some RAID levels also concatenate disks, numbered RAID levels generally use striping or parity while JBOD does not.

JBOD diagram

JBOD means the individual disks are presented (to a server) with no amalgamation, pooling or structure applied. The term is in widespread use, especially in the context of computers that have software volume management, such as LVM (AIX, HP-UX, Linux), DiskSuite (Solaris), ZFS (Solaris), Veritas Volume Manager (Unixes), Windows and so on.

This was last updated in September 2005

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Is there ever a good reason to use JBOD?
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This is the most commonly used 'array' in home computers with multiple hard drives, and in external drives supplied for them.  It is suitable for home usage because of 'non-intensive' usage [it really it is in relative terms], although it wouldn't be for a writer, for storage of financial records or of other critical data unless this were only one of multiple backups (for paranoid people like me, and people who combine 'home' and work like...me).  It is absolutely not appropriate for any business usage.
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There are 2 advantages
- Full space utilization
Unlike many Raid configurations JBOD does not limit to the size of the smallest disk with the array, a JBOD configuration will allow for the combined space of all the drives to be used by the end Operating System.
- Cost effective
Basic SATA disks and controllers are cheap in comparison to their SCSI, SAS and Hardware RAID cousins
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Just a quick question, If i have a bunch of drives with files on them and put them in a JBOD enclosure. Will i loose all of the information on them? 
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